wobbufetts:

aidn:

how the hell do i talk to people

Stand in front of them and press A

(via pokemon-photography)

iloveillustrators:

MARY BLAIR

1911-1978

Country of Origin: U.S.A.

Training: Chouinard Art Institute

Notable Works: Cinderella (1950), Alice in Wonderland (1951), Peter Pan (1953), It’s a Small World (1956)

Mary Blair was the concept artist and color supervisor for many of Walt Disney’s most prominent animated films. She worked in a very stylized and graphic way, often using bright colors. In addition to her animation work, she also illustrated dozens of children’s books and designed many of the attractions for Walt Disney World including the It’s a Small World ride and the Contemporary resort.

(via chasingdunamis)

nubbsgalore:

lightning illuminates an ash cloud that extends ten kilometres high in this june 5, 2011 eruption of puyehue volcano, near osorno in southern chile. known as a dirty thunderstorm, this phenomenon is yet to be explained by science, as the source of the lightning (or the specific mechanism by which particles of differing charges are separated in the ash cloud) continues to be debated.   

photos by (click pic) claudio santanaivan alvarado, francisco negroni and carlos gutierrez.  (see also: the eruption of japan’s sakurajima volcano and the eruptions in eyjafjallajokull, iceland

(via prettyslothsmakegraves)

kittydoom:

exgynocraticgrrl:

Breaking The Male Code: After Steubenville, A Call To Action

 (Left to Right): Peter Buffett, Jimmie Briggs, Joe Ehrmann, Tony Porter,
 Dave Zirin and Moderator Eve Ensler.

MIC DROP

(via geoffsayshi)

grimelords:

Making out with a person for the first time is the coolest thing and the second coolest thing is driving home and getting aware of all the parts of your face where they were and tasting their lip balm on your lips. The third coolest thing is outer space.

(via geoffsayshi)

"

I know that Black creativity has saved your life many times before. I know, because I’ve seen it happen. I’ve listened as non-Black people in my communities raised on Hip Hop talked about how it was the only relatable, empowering culture they found that also educated and radicalized them as a youth. It was formational. I’ve watched people become politicized, shaping their new political identities after bell hooks, Audre Lorde, Assata Shakur, Angela Davis and Frantz Fanon. I’ve watched as folks become activist celebrities using radical ideas from Black Power and Civil Rights movements to shape programs that do not benefit Black people. I’ve watched as people make livings and loads of social capital off of DJing Black music, dancing, walking and dressing like Black people, selling the Black aesthetic to others. I’ve heard that friends use Nina Simone and Sade to sing them back from depression, Rihanna and D’Angelo to get them in the mood. So many people in my communities, lately, have been using Octavia Butler to renew their hope for radical futures. Without Black people, what would your lives be? You might be thinking, you know, it’s so much more complicated than all this, race is complex, we’re all part of the human family, etc., etc…

Black art is not free for all damaged souls. When Nina sang about strange fruit, she was talking about a lynching…of Black people. When Black rappers say Fuck the Police, they speak to a state system of lynching…Black people. Your pain and isolation, however real it may be, is not the same as being Black. Your self-adoption into hip hop and djembe drumming and spoken word, makes our art forms all about you. You, however well meaning, have stolen Black labour and invention and used it for your own purpose. It warps the medium and changes the message, the magic, the healing. From now on, consider how the cost of consuming, appropriating, regurgitating, and getting your life in multiple ways from Black art, Black culture, and Black peoples’ creative genius detrimentally impacts our lives. Being Black in an anti-black world means experiencing daily attacks that threaten our dignity, our happiness, our freedom, and often our lives; and in order to enjoy Black culture, you’re going to have to take action to help get these back.

But because Black people’s labour, language, intelligence, creativity, and survival arts have always been considered free for the taking, you probably didn’t feel ways about using it. You probably didn’t think twice. Black culture is the most pilfered, the most ‘borrowed,’ the most thieved culture, and we’ve seen this happen time and time again.

"

Nadijah Robinson

Quote is from her essay Black Art Is Not A Free For All on Black Girl Dangerous. Read it all. Truly exquisite writing, especially as non-Black people continue to use, consume, pilfer, plagiarize and be appropriative of Black cultural production and art while simultaneously suggesting that Black culture, especially that Black American culture, does not exist. 

I’ve also watched non-Black people suggest Black people contribute “nothing” to anti-oppression theory or praxis while their ENTIRE FRAMEWORK for approaching it is via Black cultural production or Black women’s epistemology.

Like…the cognitive dissonance proffered via perspectives shaped by anti-Blackness is astounding.

(via gradientlair)

hit reblog before i even read it

(via queerfabulousmermaid)

(via moonbeamdaydream)

centuria:

Hironori Yasuda—hand-rendered patterns. c. 1980s

(via pukevvave)

Christopher Golebiowski
pencil and watercolors on paper
2010

(via prettyslothsmakegraves)

(Source: flowerjizz, via geoffsayshi)

"You have to believe. Otherwise, it will never happen."

Neil Gaiman, Stardust (via bookmania)

thanks universe

(via duskenpath)

(via geoffsayshi)

casualblessings:

May you express a difficult truth and find yourself loved and accepted even more fully.

(via pukevvave)